What Chickens Can and Can’t Eat: A Comprehensive Guide

Chickens are omnivorous creatures with a varied diet, and while they are not very picky eaters, there are certain foods that they can safely consume and others that should be avoided. As a responsible chicken owner, it is essential to understand what you can and cannot feed your feathered friends to ensure their health and well-being.

In this article, we will explore a wide range of foods that chickens can eat and those they should avoid. Please note that this is a general guide, and individual chickens may have specific sensitivities or allergies. Always introduce new foods gradually and monitor their reactions. Now, let’s dive into the list:

Summary of Foods for Chickens

  1. Alfalfa Pellets: Chickens can eat alfalfa pellets as part of their diet. They provide additional nutrients and can be beneficial for their health. Read more
  2. Almonds: Chickens can eat almonds, but they should be given in moderation as occasional treats. Avoid feeding them too many almonds, as they are high in fat and could cause digestive issues. Read more
  3. Aloe Vera: Chickens should not eat aloe vera as it is toxic to them. Avoid offering any parts of the plant to your chickens. Read more
  4. Apples: Chickens can eat apples. They enjoy the fruit and it provides some nutritional benefits. Just make sure to remove any seeds as they contain trace amounts of cyanide. Read more
  5. Applesauce: Chickens can eat applesauce in small quantities. Make sure it does not contain any added sugars or artificial sweeteners. Read more
  6. Apricots: Chickens can eat apricots, including the flesh and skin. However, avoid giving them the pit, as it can be a choking hazard. Read more
  7. Artichoke Leaves: Chickens can eat artichoke leaves, but they may not be very interested in them. It’s safe for them to consume, but they might prefer other greens. Read more
  8. Artichokes: Chickens can eat cooked artichokes in moderation. Make sure to remove any seasoning or additives before offering them. Read more
  9. Asparagus: Chickens can eat cooked asparagus. It’s a nutritious treat for them, but avoid giving them any raw or spoiled asparagus. Read more
  10. Avocados: Chickens should not eat avocados as they contain a toxin called persin, which is harmful to them. Avoid feeding any part of the avocado to your chickens. Read more
  11. Bacon Grease: Chickens should not be fed bacon grease or any fatty, salty foods. It’s not suitable for their digestive system and can lead to health issues. Read more
  12. Bacon: While chickens can technically eat small amounts of cooked bacon, it’s not a healthy choice for them. The high fat and salt content make it an unsuitable treat. Read more
  13. Baking Soda: Chickens can eat small amounts of baking soda occasionally. It may help with digestion, but excessive consumption should be avoided. Read more
  14. Banana Peels: Chickens can eat banana peels in moderation. They contain nutrients and can be a fun treat for them. Read more
  15. Bananas: Chickens can eat bananas as they are a good source of vitamins and minerals. Offer them as an occasional treat, not a regular diet. Read more
  16. Basil: Chickens can eat basil, and it’s safe for them. It may even have some health benefits and act as a natural insect repellent. Read more
  17. Bean Sprouts: Chickens can eat bean sprouts, but they may not be very interested in them. They are safe but not a favorite treat for most chickens. Read more
  18. Beans: Chickens can eat cooked beans in small amounts, but raw or dried beans are toxic and should be avoided. Offer beans as an occasional treat. Read more
  19. Beef: Chickens are omnivores and may eat small amounts of cooked meat, including beef. However, it’s not a necessary or recommended part of their diet. Read more
  20. Bees: Chickens may eat bees or other insects they come across. While it’s a natural behavior, avoid letting them consume bees in large quantities to prevent stings. Read more
  21. Beet Greens: Chickens can eat beet greens, and they are a nutritious addition to their diet. Ensure they are clean and free from pesticides. Read more
  22. Beets: Chickens can eat beets, but they may not be very interested in them. They are safe to consume but may not be a preferred treat. Read more
  23. Bell Peppers: Chickens can eat bell peppers, including the seeds and flesh. They are a good source of vitamins and add variety to their diet. Read more
  24. Berries: Chickens can eat various berries like strawberries, raspberries, and blueberries. They are a tasty and nutritious treat for them. Read more
  25. Bird Seed: Chickens can eat bird seed, but it’s not a substantial part of their diet. Avoid feeding them bird seed exclusively. Read more
  26. Black Beans: Chickens can eat cooked black beans in moderation. They provide protein and other nutrients for your chickens. Read more
  27. Black-Eyed Peas: Chickens can eat cooked black-eyed peas. They are safe and can be offered as an occasional treat. Read more
  28. Black Olives: Chickens can eat black olives in moderation. However, they are high in sodium, so limit the amount you offer. Read more
  29. Black Widows: Chickens should not eat black widows or any spiders. While chickens may eat insects, it’s essential to avoid poisonous ones. Read more
  30. Blackberries: Chickens can eat blackberries, and they are a great source of antioxidants. Offer them as a tasty and healthy treat. Read more
  31. Blueberries: Chickens can eat blueberries, and they are a nutritious treat packed with vitamins and antioxidants. Offer them fresh or frozen. Read more
  32. Bok Choy: Chickens can eat bok choy, and it’s a nutritious leafy green for them. Chop it into smaller pieces for easier consumption. Read more
  33. Borage: Chickens can eat borage, and it’s safe for them. Borage leaves and flowers can be offered as an occasional treat. Read more
  34. Bread: Chickens can eat bread, but it should be given in moderation. Avoid bread with added sugars or high salt content. Read more
  35. Broccoli Stems: Chickens can eat broccoli stems, and they provide additional nutrients. Offer them in small, manageable pieces. Read more
  36. Brown Rice: Chickens can eat cooked brown rice in moderation. It’s a good source of energy for them. Read more
  37. Brussels Sprouts: Chickens can eat cooked Brussels sprouts. These veggies offer a variety of nutrients and can be a healthy treat. Read more
  38. Buckwheat: Chickens can eat buckwheat, but it should be cooked and offered in moderation. It’s a good source of protein. Read more
  39. Cabbage: Chickens can eat cabbage, but it should be given in small amounts. Too much cabbage can cause digestive issues. Read more
  40. Cactus: Chickens can eat cactus, including the pads and fruit. Ensure the cactus is free from thorns before offering it to them. Read more
  41. Cake: Chickens should not eat cake or any sugary, processed foods. They don’t provide any nutritional value and can be harmful in excess. Read more
  42. Canned Beans: Chickens can eat cooked, plain canned beans in moderation. Rinse off excess salt before offering them. Read more
  43. Canned Black Beans: Chickens can eat cooked, plain canned black beans occasionally. Avoid beans with added spices or flavorings. Read more
  44. Canned Corn: Chickens can eat canned corn, but it should be given sparingly due to its high carbohydrate content. Read more
  45. Cantaloupe Seeds: Chickens can eat cantaloupe seeds, and they might enjoy pecking at them. Offer seeds in moderation. Read more
  46. Cantaloupe: Chickens can eat cantaloupe, and it’s a refreshing treat for them, especially in hot weather. Read more
  47. Carnations: Chickens should not eat carnations or any other flowers. Some flowers can be toxic to them. Read more
  48. Carrots: Chickens can eat carrots, and they are a healthy treat packed with vitamins. Offer them chopped or grated. Read more
  49. Cashews: Chickens can eat cashews in small amounts as an occasional treat. Avoid salted or flavored varieties. Read more
  50. Cauliflower Leaves: Chickens can eat cauliflower leaves, and they provide additional greens to their diet. Read more
  51. Cauliflower: Chickens can eat cauliflower, and it’s a nutritious vegetable for them. Offer it chopped into smaller pieces for easy consumption. Read more
  52. Celery Stalks: Chickens can eat celery stalks, and they are a healthy treat. Ensure the celery is fresh and free from any pesticides. Read more
  53. Centipedes: Chickens may eat centipedes and other insects they come across. While it’s a natural behavior, avoid letting them consume toxic insects. Read more
  54. Chard: Chickens can eat chard, and it’s a nutritious leafy green for them. Offer it in small amounts as a treat. Read more
  55. Cheerios: Chickens can eat plain, unsweetened Cheerios as an occasional treat. Avoid flavored or sweetened varieties. Read more
  56. Cheese: Chickens can eat cheese in small amounts as a treat. Avoid giving them overly processed or salty cheese. Read more
  57. Cherries: Chickens can eat cherries, but they should be given in moderation due to their pits. Remove the pits before offering them. Read more
  58. Cherry Tomatoes: Chickens can eat cherry tomatoes, and they are a tasty treat. Offer them ripe tomatoes in small quantities. Read more
  59. Chia Seeds: Chickens can eat chia seeds, and they provide some nutritional benefits. Offer them in small amounts as an occasional treat. Read more
  60. Chia Sprouts: Chickens can eat chia sprouts, and they are a good source of nutrients. Offer them fresh and clean. Read more
  61. Chickpeas: Chickens can eat cooked chickpeas, and they provide protein and other nutrients. Offer them in moderation. Read more
  62. Chickweed: Chickens can eat chickweed, and it’s safe for them. It’s a common weed that they might find in the yard. Read more
  63. Chips: Chickens should not eat chips or any salty, processed snacks. They don’t offer any nutritional value and can be harmful in excess. Read more
  64. Chives: Chickens can eat chives, and they are safe in small amounts. Offer them fresh and chopped. Read more
  65. Chocolate: Chickens should not eat chocolate or any cocoa products. Chocolate is toxic to them and can be lethal. Read more
  66. Cilantro Stems: Chickens can eat cilantro stems, and they provide some nutritional benefits. Offer them fresh and clean. Read more
  67. Cilantro: Chickens can eat cilantro leaves, and they might enjoy the herb as a treat. Offer it fresh and clean. Read more
  68. Cinnamon: Chickens can eat cinnamon in small amounts. It’s safe for them and may have some health benefits. Read more
  69. Citrus: Chickens can eat small amounts of citrus fruits like oranges, lemons, or tangerines. Offer them in moderation as treats. Read more
  70. Coconut Oil: Chickens can eat coconut oil, and it may have some health benefits for them. Offer it in small amounts. Read more
  71. Coffee Grounds: Chickens can eat coffee grounds in small amounts, but it’s best to avoid giving them caffeinated products. Read more
  72. Coleslaw: Chickens can eat coleslaw, but it should be given in moderation. Avoid coleslaw with excessive dressing or spices. Read more
  73. Collard Greens: Chickens can eat collard greens, and they are a nutritious leafy green for them. Offer them in small amounts. Read more
  74. Comfrey: Chickens can eat comfrey leaves in small amounts, but it’s best to avoid large quantities due to potential liver issues. Read more
  75. Cooked Grits: Chickens can eat cooked grits, and they provide some energy. Offer them plain without added flavorings. Read more
  76. Cooked Pasta: Chickens can eat cooked pasta, but it should be offered in moderation. Avoid pasta with added seasonings or sauces. Read more
  77. Corn Flakes: Chickens can eat corn flakes, but they should be given in moderation. Avoid flakes with added sugars. Read more
  78. Corn Husks: Chickens can eat corn husks, but they are not very nutritious for them. Offer husks in small amounts as a treat. Read more
  79. Corn Meal: Chickens can eat cornmeal, but it should be cooked and offered in moderation. Read more
  80. Corn Tortillas: Chickens can eat corn tortillas in small amounts, but they should not be a significant part of their diet. Read more
  81. Corn: Chickens can eat corn, but it should be offered in moderation as a treat. Corn should not be a primary feed for them. Read more
  82. Cornbread: Chickens can eat cornbread, but it should be given sparingly due to its high carbohydrate content. Read more
  83. Cottage Cheese: Chickens can eat cottage cheese in small amounts as a protein-rich treat. Read more
  84. Crab Apples: Chickens can eat crab apples, and they might enjoy them as a treat. Offer them in small quantities. Read more
  85. Crab Shells: Chickens should not eat crab shells or any sharp, hard objects. Ensure their environment is free from potential hazards. Read more
  86. Crackers: Chickens can eat plain crackers in small amounts, but they should not be a significant part of their diet. Read more
  87. Crawfish: Chickens can eat cooked crawfish, and they might enjoy them as a protein-rich treat. Read more
  88. Cream of Wheat: Chickens can eat cream of wheat in small amounts as a treat. Avoid flavored varieties with added sugar. Read more
  89. Cucumber Leaves: Chickens can eat cucumber leaves, and they are safe for them. It’s a healthy leafy green for them. Read more
  90. Cucumber Peelings: Chickens can eat cucumber peelings, and they might enjoy them as a treat. Offer them fresh and clean. Read more
  91. Cucumbers: Chickens can eat cucumbers, and they are a hydrating treat for them, especially in hot weather. Read more
  92. Dairy: Chickens can eat small amounts of dairy products like yogurt or cheese. Offer them as occasional treats. Read more
  93. Dandelions: Chickens can eat dandelions, and they might even forage for them in the yard. Ensure they are free from pesticides. Read more
  94. Dates: Chickens can eat dates, but they should be given in moderation due to their high sugar content. Read more
  95. Deer Corn: Chickens can eat deer corn, but it should not be their primary feed. It’s often less nutritious than regular chicken feed. Read more
  96. Dill Pickles: Chickens can eat small amounts of dill pickles, but they should not be a significant part of their diet. Read more
  97. Dill: Chickens can eat dill leaves and seeds, and they may enjoy them as a treat. Offer fresh dill in small quantities. Read more
  98. Dog Food: Chickens can eat dog food in small amounts, but it should not be their primary diet. Offer it as an occasional treat. Read more
  99. Donuts: Chickens should not eat donuts or any sugary, processed pastries. They don’t offer any nutritional value and can be harmful in excess. Read more
  100. Dragon Fruit: Chickens can eat dragon fruit, and it’s a unique and nutritious treat for them. Offer it in small amounts. Read more
  101. Edamame: Chickens can eat edamame, and it’s a good source of protein for them. Offer them cooked and unsalted edamame. Read more
  102. Egg Shells: Chickens can eat crushed eggshells, and they provide a calcium boost for laying hens. Ensure they are clean and free from any residue. Read more
  103. Eggplant: Chickens can eat eggplant, but it should be cooked and offered in moderation. Read more
  104. Eggs: Chickens can eat cooked eggs, including their own eggs. However, avoid feeding them raw eggs to prevent egg-eating behavior. Read more
  105. Elderberries: Chickens can eat elderberries in small amounts, but they should be given in moderation. Read more
  106. Fennel: Chickens can eat fennel, and it’s safe for them. Offer it as an occasional treat. Read more
  107. Fish Bones: Chickens can eat small, cooked fish bones, but they should not be their primary source of protein. Read more
  108. Fish: Chickens can eat cooked fish, and it can be a good source of protein for them. Offer it in moderation. Read more
  109. Flax Seeds: Chickens can eat flax seeds, and they provide some nutritional benefits. Offer them in moderation. Read more
  110. Flaxseed: Chickens can eat ground flaxseed, and it can be a healthy addition to their diet. Offer it in moderation. Read more
  111. Frogs: Chickens may eat frogs and other small animals they come across. While it’s a natural behavior, avoid letting them consume toxic creatures. Read more
  112. Frozen Peas: Chickens can eat frozen peas, and they are a convenient and healthy treat for them. Thaw them before offering. Read more
  113. Fruit: Chickens can eat various fruits like apples, berries, watermelon, etc. Offer them in moderation as treats. Read more
  114. Garbanzo Beans: Chickens can eat cooked garbanzo beans, and they are a good source of protein. Offer them in moderation. Read more
  115. Garlic: Chickens can eat garlic in small amounts, and it may have some health benefits for them. Offer it in moderation. Read more
  116. Goat Feed: Chickens can eat goat feed occasionally, but it should not be their primary diet. Offer it as a rare treat. Read more
  117. Gourds: Chickens can eat gourds, including varieties like squash or pumpkin. Offer them in moderation. Read more
  118. Graham Crackers: Chickens can eat plain graham crackers in small amounts, but they should not be a significant part of their diet. Read more
  119. Granola: Chickens can eat granola in small amounts, but it should not be a primary food for them due to its sugar content. Read more
  120. Grape Seeds: Chickens can eat grapes, but it’s best to avoid feeding them the seeds as they may be a choking hazard. Read more
  121. Grapefruit: Chickens can eat grapefruit in small amounts, but it should be given in moderation due to its acidity. Read more
  122. Grapes: Chickens can eat grapes, and they are a tasty and hydrating treat for them. Offer them in moderation. Read more
  123. Grass: Chickens can eat grass, and it’s a natural part of their diet when they are free-ranging. Ensure it’s free from pesticides. Read more
  124. Green Beans: Chickens can eat green beans, and they are a healthy treat for them. Offer them fresh or cooked. Read more
  125. Green Onion: Chickens can eat green onions, and they may enjoy them as a treat. Offer them in small quantities. Read more
  126. Green Peppers: Chickens can eat green peppers, and they are a healthy treat for them. Offer them in small amounts. Read more
  127. Grits: Chickens can eat grits, but they should be cooked and offered in moderation. Read more
  128. Ground Beef: Chickens can eat cooked ground beef, but it should be given in moderation as a protein-rich treat. Read more
  129. Grubs: Chickens can eat grubs, and they may naturally forage for them in the soil. Grubs are a good source of protein. Read more
  130. Guinea Pig Food: Chickens can eat guinea pig food in small amounts, but it should not be their primary diet. Offer it as an occasional treat. Read more
  131. Ham: Chickens can eat cooked ham, but it should be given in moderation as a treat. Read more
  132. Hamburgers: Chickens can eat cooked plain hamburgers in small amounts, but they should not be a significant part of their diet. Read more
  133. Hamster Food: Chickens can eat hamster food occasionally, but it should not be their primary diet. Offer it as a rare treat. Read more
  134. Hay: Chickens can eat hay, and it’s a good source of fiber for them. Offer it in small amounts. Read more
  135. Hemp Seeds: Chickens can eat hemp seeds, and they provide some nutritional benefits. Offer them in moderation. Read more
  136. Honey Nut Cheerios: Chickens can eat plain, unsweetened Honey Nut Cheerios as an occasional treat. Avoid varieties with added sugar. Read more
  137. Honey: Chickens can eat honey, and it may have some health benefits for them. Offer it in small amounts. Read more
  138. Honeydew Melon: Chickens can eat honeydew melon, and it’s a refreshing treat for them, especially in hot weather. Read more
  139. Hornworms: Chickens can eat hornworms and other insects they come across. While it’s a natural behavior, avoid letting them consume toxic insects. Read more
  140. Horse Feed: Chickens can eat horse feed occasionally, but it should not be their primary diet. Offer it as a rare treat. Read more
  141. Hostas: Chickens should not eat hostas or any toxic plants. Ensure their environment is free from potential hazards. Read more
  142. Hot Dogs: Chickens can eat plain cooked hot dogs in small amounts, but they should not be a significant part of their diet. Read more
  143. Hummus: Chickens can eat hummus in small amounts, but it should not be their primary diet. Offer it as an occasional treat. Read more
  144. Ice Cream: Chickens should not eat ice cream or any sugary, dairy-based desserts. They don’t offer any nutritional value and can be harmful in excess. Read more
  145. Iceberg Lettuce: Chickens can eat iceberg lettuce, but it has low nutritional value. Offer it in moderation as an occasional treat. Read more
  146. Jalapenos: Chickens can eat jalapenos, but they are spicy, so offer them in moderation. Avoid feeding them to young or sensitive birds. Read more
  147. Japanese Beetles: Chickens can eat Japanese beetles and other insects they come across. While it’s a natural behavior, avoid letting them consume toxic insects. Read more
  148. Jicama: Chickens can eat jicama, and it’s a safe and healthy treat for them. Offer it in moderation. Read more
  149. June Bugs: Chickens can eat June bugs and other insects they come across. While it’s a natural behavior, avoid letting them consume toxic insects. Read more
  150. Kale: Chickens can eat kale, and it’s a nutritious leafy green for them. Offer it in moderation. Read more
  151. Kiwi: Chickens can eat kiwi, and it’s a refreshing and healthy treat for them. Offer it in small amounts. Read more
  152. Kohlrabi: Chickens can eat kohlrabi, and it’s a safe and healthy treat for them. Offer it in moderation. Read more
  153. Lavender: Chickens can eat lavender, and they may enjoy it as a treat. Offer it in small quantities. Read more
  154. Lemon Peels: Chickens can eat lemon peels, but they should be given in moderation. Offer them fresh and clean. Read more
  155. Lemongrass: Chickens can eat lemongrass, and they may enjoy it as a treat. Offer it in small quantities. Read more
  156. Lemons: Chickens can eat lemons, but they should be given in moderation. Offer them in small amounts. Read more
  157. Lentils: Chickens can eat cooked lentils, and they are a good source of protein. Offer them in moderation. Read more
  158. Lettuce: Chickens can eat lettuce, and it’s a safe leafy green for them. Offer a variety of lettuces for a balanced diet. Read more
  159. Lima Beans: Chickens can eat cooked lima beans, but they should be given in moderation. Read more
  160. Limes: Chickens can eat limes, but they should be given in moderation. Offer them in small amounts. Read more
  161. Mac and Cheese: Chickens can eat plain, unseasoned mac and cheese in small amounts, but it should not be a significant part of their diet. Read more
  162. Maggots: Chickens can eat maggots and other insects they come across. While it’s a natural behavior, avoid letting them consume toxic insects. Read more
  163. Mandarin Oranges: Chickens can eat mandarin oranges, and they may enjoy them as a treat. Offer them in moderation. Read more
  164. Mango: Chickens can eat mango, and it’s a delicious and healthy treat for them. Offer it in moderation. Read more
  165. Marigolds: Chickens can eat marigold flowers, and they are safe for them. However, ensure they are free from pesticides. Read more
  166. Marshmallows: Chickens should not eat marshmallows or any sugary, processed sweets. They don’t offer any nutritional value and can be harmful in excess. Read more
  167. Meat: Chickens can eat cooked meat, including chicken, but it should be given in moderation as a treat. Read more
  168. Melon: Chickens can eat various types of melon like watermelon, cantaloupe, etc. Offer them in moderation as a treat. Read more
  169. Microgreens: Chickens can eat microgreens, and they may enjoy them as a treat. Offer a variety of microgreens for a balanced diet. Read more
  170. Mint: Chickens can eat mint leaves, and they may enjoy them as a treat. Offer them fresh and clean. Read more
  171. Moldy Bread: Chickens should not eat moldy bread or any moldy food. Ensure their feed is fresh and free from mold. Read more
  172. Moldy Food: Chickens should not eat moldy food as it can be harmful to them. Ensure their feed is fresh and free from mold. Read more
  173. Mulberries: Chickens can eat mulberries, and they are a nutritious treat for them. Offer them in moderation. Read more
  174. Mushrooms: Chickens can eat some types of mushrooms, but it’s safer to avoid wild mushrooms to prevent poisoning. Read more
  175. Mustard Greens: Chickens can eat mustard greens, and they are a nutritious leafy green for them. Offer them in moderation. Read more
  176. Noodles: Chickens can eat cooked noodles, but they should be given in moderation. Plain pasta without added sauce is best. Read more
  177. Oats: Chickens can eat oats, and they are a good source of carbohydrates for them. Offer them plain and cooked. Read more
  178. Okra: Chickens can eat okra, and it’s a safe and healthy treat for them. Offer it in moderation. Read more
  179. Olive Oil: Chickens can eat olive oil in small amounts, but it should not be a significant part of their diet. Read more
  180. Olives: Chickens can eat olives, and they are a nutritious treat for them. Offer them in moderation. Read more
  181. Onions: Chickens should not eat onions or any foods from the onion family as they can be toxic to them. Read more
  182. Oranges: Chickens can eat oranges, and they may enjoy them as a treat. Offer them in moderation. Read more
  183. Oregano: Chickens can eat oregano, and it may have some health benefits for them. Offer it in small amounts. Read more
  184. Pancakes: Chickens can eat plain, unseasoned pancakes in small amounts, but they should not be a significant part of their diet. Read more
  185. Papaya Seeds: Chickens can eat papaya seeds, and they may have some health benefits for them. Offer them in moderation. Read more
  186. Parsley: Chickens can eat parsley, and it’s a nutritious treat for them. Offer it in small amounts. Read more
  187. Parsnips: Chickens can eat parsnips, and they are a safe and healthy treat for them. Offer them in moderation. Read more
  188. Pasta: Chickens can eat cooked pasta, but they should be given in moderation. Plain pasta without added sauce is best. Read more
  189. Pea Pods: Chickens can eat pea pods, and they are a healthy treat for them. Offer them fresh or cooked. Read more
  190. Peaches: Chickens can eat peaches, and they are a delicious and healthy treat for them. Offer them in moderation. Read more
  191. Peanut Shells: Chickens can eat peanut shells, but they should be given in moderation. Offer them fresh and clean. Read more
  192. Pecans: Chickens can eat pecans, and they are a nutritious treat for them. Offer them in moderation. Read more
  193. Pepperoni: Chickens can eat plain, unseasoned pepperoni in small amounts, but it should not be a significant part of their diet. Read more
  194. Peppers: Chickens can eat various types of peppers like bell peppers, jalapenos, etc. Offer them in moderation. Read more
  195. Persimmons: Chickens can eat persimmons, and they are a nutritious treat for them. Offer them in moderation. Read more
  196. Pickles: Chickens can eat plain pickles in small amounts, but they should not be a significant part of their diet. Read more
  197. Pineapple Skin: Chickens should not eat pineapple skin as it can be tough and difficult for them to digest. Offer them the juicy fruit instead. Read more
  198. Pineapple: Chickens can eat pineapple, and it’s a delicious and healthy treat for them. Offer it in moderation. Read more
  199. Pinto Beans: Chickens can eat cooked pinto beans, but they should be given in moderation. Read more
  200. Plums: Chickens can eat plums, and they are a delicious and healthy treat for them. Remove the pit before offering them to the chickens. Read more
  201. Poison Ivy: Chickens can eat poison ivy and other plants, but it’s essential to avoid introducing toxic plants into their environment. Read more
  202. Pomegranate Skin: Chickens should not eat pomegranate skin as it can be tough and difficult for them to digest. Offer them the juicy arils instead. Read more
  203. Pomegranate: Chickens can eat pomegranate, and it’s a nutritious and tasty treat for them. Offer the juicy arils in moderation. Read more
  204. Popcorn Kernels: Chickens should not eat popcorn kernels as they can pose a choking hazard. Offer them popped and plain popcorn instead. Read more
  205. Popcorn: Chickens can eat plain, unsalted, and unbuttered popcorn as an occasional treat. Avoid offering flavored or processed popcorn. Read more
  206. Poppy Seeds: Chickens can eat poppy seeds, and they are safe for them. Offer them in small amounts as part of a balanced diet. Read more
  207. Pork: Chickens should not eat pork or any meat products. It’s not a suitable part of their diet. Read more
  208. Potato Chips: Chickens should not eat potato chips or any salty, processed snacks. They don’t offer any nutritional value and can be harmful in excess. Read more
  209. Potato Peels: Chickens can eat potato peels, but they should be cooked and offered in moderation. Avoid giving them green or sprouted potatoes. Read more
  210. Potatoes: Chickens can eat cooked potatoes, but they should be offered in moderation. Avoid giving them green or sprouted potatoes. Read more
  211. Prunes: Chickens can eat prunes, but they should be given in moderation due to their laxative properties. Read more
  212. Pumpkin Pie: Chickens should not eat pumpkin pie or any sweet desserts. They don’t offer any nutritional value and can be harmful in excess. Read more
  213. Pumpkin: Chickens can eat pumpkin, and it’s a nutritious treat for them. They may enjoy both the flesh and seeds. Read more
  214. Purple Cabbage: Chickens can eat purple cabbage, and it’s a nutritious leafy vegetable for them. Offer it in moderation. Read more
  215. Quaker Oats: Chickens can eat Quaker oats, and it’s a good source of carbohydrates for them. Offer it in moderation. Read more
  216. Quinoa: Chickens can eat quinoa, and it’s a nutritious grain for them. Offer it cooked and in moderation. Read more
  217. Rabbit Food: Chickens should not eat rabbit food as it’s not formulated for their nutritional needs. Stick to chicken feed for them. Read more
  218. Radish Tops: Chickens can eat radish tops, and they are safe and nutritious for them. Offer them fresh and clean. Read more
  219. Radishes: Chickens can eat radishes, and they are a healthy treat for them. Offer them fresh and clean. Read more
  220. Raisins: Chickens can eat raisins, and they may enjoy them as a treat. Offer them in moderation. Read more
  221. Raw Eggs: Chickens can eat raw eggs, but it’s best to offer them cooked eggs to avoid any potential health risks. Read more
  222. Raw Fish: Chickens should not eat raw fish as it can contain harmful bacteria. If you want to give them fish, it should be cooked and boneless. Read more
  223. Raw Meat: Chickens should not eat raw meat or any raw animal products. Stick to cooked meat if you want to offer it to them. Read more
  224. Raw Okra: Chickens can eat raw okra, and it’s a safe and healthy treat for them. Offer it in moderation. Read more
  225. Raw Rice: Chickens should not eat raw rice as it can expand in their stomachs and cause health issues. Cooked rice is safe for them. Read more
  226. Raw Squash: Chickens can eat raw squash, and it’s a safe and healthy treat for them. Offer it in moderation. Read more
  227. Red Cabbage: Chickens can eat red cabbage, and it’s a nutritious leafy vegetable for them. Offer it in moderation. Read more
  228. Red Pepper Flakes: Chickens can eat red pepper flakes, but they should be given in moderation. The spiciness may not be suitable for all chickens. Read more
  229. Rhubarb Leaves: Chickens should not eat rhubarb leaves or any part of the rhubarb plant as it is toxic to them. Read more
  230. Rhubarb: Chickens can eat small amounts of cooked rhubarb stalks, but it’s not a preferred treat due to its tartness. Read more
  231. Rice Krispies: Chickens can eat plain Rice Krispies cereal, but it should not be a significant part of their diet. Read more
  232. Rice: Chickens can eat rice, and it’s a good source of carbohydrates for them. Offer it cooked and in moderation. Read more
  233. Rolled Oats: Chickens can eat rolled oats, and they are a good source of carbohydrates for them. Offer them in moderation. Read more
  234. Romaine Lettuce: Chickens can eat romaine lettuce, and it’s a nutritious leafy green for them. Offer it in moderation. Read more
  235. Rose Petals: Chickens can eat rose petals, and they may enjoy them as a treat. Make sure they are pesticide-free. Read more
  236. Rosemary: Chickens can eat rosemary, and it’s safe for them. Offer it in moderation, as strong herbs should be given in small amounts. Read more
  237. Salmon: Chickens can eat cooked salmon, but it should be given in moderation due to its high-fat content. Read more
  238. Sauerkraut: Chickens can eat sauerkraut, but it should be given in moderation. The probiotics can be beneficial for them. Read more
  239. Sausage: Chickens should not eat sausage or any processed meat products. Stick to a balanced diet for their health. Read more
  240. Seaweed: Chickens can eat seaweed, and it may have some nutritional benefits for them. Offer it in small amounts. Read more
  241. Sesame Seeds: Chickens can eat sesame seeds, and they are safe for them. Offer them in moderation as part of a balanced diet. Read more
  242. Shrimp Shells: Chickens should not eat shrimp shells or any seafood shells. They are difficult to digest and may pose a choking hazard. Read more
  243. Shrimp: Chickens can eat cooked shrimp, but it should be given in moderation due to its high protein content. Read more
  244. Slugs: Chickens can eat slugs, and they may naturally consume them when foraging. However, avoid using slug bait or pesticides near chickens. Read more
  245. Snails: Chickens can eat snails, and they may naturally consume them when foraging. However, avoid using snail bait or pesticides near chickens. Read more
  246. Snakes: Chickens should not eat snakes or any live animals. Their diet should consist of plant-based and commercially prepared foods. Read more
  247. Snap Peas: Chickens can eat snap peas, and they are a healthy treat for them. Offer them fresh and clean. Read more
  248. Sourdough Bread: Chickens can eat plain, unseasoned sourdough bread in small amounts, but it should not be a significant part of their diet. Read more
  249. Soybeans: Chickens can eat soybeans, but they should be cooked and offered in moderation. Raw soybeans contain anti-nutrients. Read more
  250. Spaghetti Squash: Chickens can eat spaghetti squash, and it’s a nutritious treat for them. They may enjoy the flesh and seeds. Read more
  251. Spaghetti: Chickens can eat cooked spaghetti, but it should be given in moderation. Plain pasta without added sauce is best. Read more
  252. Spicy Food: Chickens should not eat spicy or highly seasoned food. Their digestive systems are not well-suited for spicy ingredients. Read more
  253. Spiders: Chickens can eat spiders and other insects, and they may naturally consume them when foraging. Read more
  254. Spinach: Chickens can eat spinach, and it’s a nutritious leafy green for them. Offer it in moderation. Read more
  255. Split Peas: Chickens can eat split peas, and they are a good source of protein for them. Offer them cooked and in moderation. Read more
  256. Squash Seeds: Chickens can eat squash seeds, and they may enjoy them as a treat. Make sure the seeds are clean and free from mold. Read more
  257. Squash: Chickens can eat various types of squash like zucchini, butternut squash, etc. Offer them in moderation. Read more
  258. Star Fruit: Chickens can eat star fruit, and it’s a delicious and healthy treat for them. Offer it in moderation. Read more
  259. Steak: Chickens should not eat steak or any meat products. Their diet should consist of plant-based and commercially prepared foods. Read more
  260. Strawberries: Chickens can eat strawberries, and they are a tasty treat for them. Offer them in moderation. Read more
  261. Sunflowers: Chickens can eat sunflowers, and they may enjoy the seeds and petals. Ensure the seeds are clean and free from mold. Read more
  262. Sweet Feed: Chickens should not eat sweet feed or any feed designed for other animals. Stick to chicken feed for their nutritional needs. Read more
  263. Sweet Peppers: Chickens can eat sweet peppers, and they are a healthy and colorful treat for them. Offer them fresh and clean. Read more
  264. Sweet Potatoes: Chickens can eat sweet potatoes, and they are a nutritious and tasty treat for them. Offer them cooked and in moderation. Read more
  265. Swiss Chard: Chickens can eat Swiss chard, and it’s a nutritious leafy green for them. Offer it in moderation. Read more
  266. Table Scraps: Chickens can eat some table scraps, but it’s essential to avoid feeding them harmful or unhealthy foods. Read more
  267. Thyme: Chickens can eat thyme, and it’s safe for them. Offer it in moderation, as strong herbs should be given in small amounts. Read more
  268. Tofu: Chickens can eat tofu, and it’s a good source of plant-based protein for them. Offer it cooked and in moderation. Read more
  269. Tomatillos: Chickens can eat tomatillos, and they are safe for them. Offer them in moderation as part of a varied diet. Read more
  270. Tomato Hornworms: Chickens can eat tomato hornworms and other insects, and they may naturally consume them when foraging. Read more
  271. Tomatoes: Chickens can eat tomatoes, but they should be given in moderation. Avoid feeding them the leaves and stems as they are toxic. Read more
  272. Turmeric: Chickens can eat turmeric, and it’s safe for them. Offer it in moderation as part of a balanced diet. Read more
  273. Tuna: Chickens can eat cooked tuna, but it should be given in moderation due to its high mercury content. Read more
  274. Turkey: Chickens should not eat turkey or any meat products. Their diet should consist of plant-based and commercially prepared foods. Read more
  275. Turnips: Chickens can eat turnips, and they are a nutritious root vegetable for them. Offer them cooked and in moderation. Read more
  276. Wasps: Chickens can eat wasps and other insects, and they may naturally consume them when foraging. Read more
  277. Watermelon Rind: Chickens can eat watermelon rind, and it’s a refreshing treat for them. Offer it in moderation. Read more
  278. Watermelon: Chickens can eat watermelon, and it’s a delicious and hydrating treat for them, especially in hot weather. Read more
  279. Weeds: Chickens can eat various weeds when foraging, but be cautious of weeds that may be toxic or sprayed with chemicals. Read more
  280. Weevils: Chickens can eat weevils and other insects, and they may naturally consume them when foraging. Read more
  281. Wheat Grass: Chickens can eat wheatgrass, and it may have some nutritional benefits for them. Offer it in small amounts. Read more
  282. White Rice: Chickens can eat white rice, and it’s a good source of carbohydrates for them. Offer it cooked and in moderation. Read more
  283. Wild Bird Seed: Chickens should not eat wild bird seed as it’s not formulated for their nutritional needs. Stick to chicken feed for them. Read more
  284. Worms: Chickens can eat worms, and they are a natural part of their diet when they forage. Mealworms are a popular treat for chickens. Read more
  285. Yams: Chickens can eat yams, and they are a nutritious and tasty treat for them. Offer them cooked and in moderation. Read more
  286. Yellow Squash: Chickens can eat yellow squash, and it’s a nutritious treat for them. They may enjoy the flesh and seeds. Read more
  287. Yogurt: Chickens can eat plain, unsweetened yogurt in small amounts, and it can be beneficial for their digestion. Read more
  288. Zinnias: Chickens can eat zinnias, and they may enjoy them as a treat. Make sure they are pesticide-free. Read more
  289. Zucchini: Chickens can eat zucchini, and it’s a nutritious treat for them. They may enjoy the flesh and seeds. Read more

Conclusion

Ensuring that your chicken has a well-balanced and safe diet is essential for their health and happiness. Providing a steady supply of fresh hay, fresh vegetables, and high-quality pellets is the key to keeping them nourished. Remember to introduce new foods gradually and monitor your chickens for any signs of digestive upset. Always avoid foods that are known to be toxic to chickens.

By offering a variety of safe and nutritious foods, you can ensure your chickens enjoy a happy and healthy life as a cherished member of your family.